Find My Ancestor Blog
4Apr/110

Weekly Genealogy Wallpaper – 4/4/2011

Here is your Weekly Genealogy Wallpaper! I am going to start including some more information along with these wallpapers from time to time. Whenever I create a historical wallpaper or a location based wallpaper I will include other blogs, websites, histories and other information. Also, many of you will notice the sizes of wallpaper has changed. After a couple months of making these wallpapers and monitoring the stats of the visitors of this blog and website I have decided to modify the wallpaper sizes to better fit your computer monitor. The new sizes are close if not exact sizes of the most common monitor resolutions of the visitors. I hope these sizes will work better for your computers. Please let me know if you have any questions or comments. Civil War Wallpaper  

1861–1865

The Civil War

Civil War Blogs

Civil War Records

Civil War Education

Civil War Photos

18Nov/100

I Am Thankful For – 18 November, 2010

Today I would like to express my thanks for many people who have been involved in all the amazing technology we have today that helps us do our genealogy.

Even though I never did genealogy 20, 15 or even 10 years ago, I know some of the techniques and ways of doing genealogy back then. Even 10 years ago we did not have most of the databases, internet websites and software programs we have today.

One of the most important things these days to help you accomplish your genealogical research are good genealogy database programs for your computer. There are dozens of programs available today that enable you to create a family tree or database of your family. Each program has pros and cons, but the most important thing when determining a software program is to use what works for you. As long as you can thoroughly document, organize and know how to navigate through your research, any program can work well for you.

The following are some of the most popular database software programs:

Windows/PC


Mac


There are dozens of databases available today that we can access millions of records without leaving our house. These databases have changed the way we can do some of our research. Whereas before, now we can access some of the most common records such as census records, death records and newspapers directly from our home computer.

The following are some of the most popular internet databases:

23Sep/100

Ancestry.com to Acquire iArchives (Footnote.com)

The following is a press release by Ancestry.com's CEO Tim Sullivan:



PROVO, Utah, September 23, 2010 – Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq: ACOM) announced today it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire iArchives, Inc. and its branded Web site, Footnote.com, a leading American History Web site, for approximately $27 million in a mix of Ancestry.com stock, cash and assumption of liabilities.  This acquisition will provide the company with a complementary consumer brand, expanded content offerings, and enhanced digitization and image-viewing technologies.

iArchives digitizes and delivers high-quality images of American historical records of individuals involved in the Revolutionary War, Continental Congress, Civil War, and other US historical events to Footnote.com subscribers interested in early American roots. iArchives has digitized more than 65 million original source documents to date through its proprietary digitization process for paper, microfilm and microfiche collections.

“Footnote.com is highly complementary to Ancestry.com’s online family history offering,” said Tim Sullivan, President and Chief Executive Officer of Ancestry.com. “By promoting Footnote to our Ancestry audience, we hope to expand its reach among researchers who care about early American records. iArchives also brings outstanding image-viewing technology and content digitization capabilities that will improve our leadership position in bringing valuable historical records to the market. We welcome the iArchives team to the Ancestry.com family.”

Upon completion of the transaction, iArchives will become a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ancestry.com. As part of the transaction, Ancestry.com currently expects to issue approximately 1.0 million shares of common stock. The transaction is subject to various closing conditions and is expected to close early in the fourth quarter of 2010.

Ancestry.com also announced today that its Board of Directors has approved a share repurchase program of up to approximately $25 million of its common stock. Under the authorization, share repurchases may be made by the Company from time to time in the open market or through privately negotiated transactions depending on market conditions, share price and other factors and may include accelerated or forward or similar stock repurchases and/or Rule 10b5-1 plans. Part of the rationale for the repurchase is to offset dilution of equity resulting from the iArchives acquisition. No time limit was set for the completion of this program. The share repurchase program may be modified or discontinued at any time by the Board of Directors.
About Ancestry.com
Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq: ACOM) is the world's largest online family history resource, with approximately 1.3 million paying subscribers. More than 5 billion records have been added to the site in the past 13 years. Ancestry users have created more than 19 million family trees containing over 1.9 billion profiles. Ancestry.com has local Web sites directed at nine countries, including its flagship Web site at www.ancestry.com.

About iArchives

iArchives is a leading digitization service provider that also operates Footnote.com, a subscription Web site that features searchable original documents, providing over 35,000 paying subscribers with a view of the events, places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com, all are invited to come share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues. For more information, visit www.footnote.com.

27Feb/101

Are you a "Family Search Member"?

In Bryce Roper's presentation this morning at the St. George Family History Expo he talked about Family Search's Record Search.

Record Search is a site with digitized and indexed records from the Granite Mountain Vault just outside of Salt Lake City. The Granite Mountain Vault has one of the largest collections of microfilm and microfiche in the world. Collections include information from all over the world. Record Search gives access to these digitized and indexed records.

If you have used Record Search, you probably have found that there are some records that only have the index, some have index and images, and others only have the images.

You may have noticed that sometimes there is a link taking you to a different website such as Footnote or FindMyPast to view the image instead of viewing it on the Record Search site. The reason some things are not available on Record Search, but rather an affiliate site it because Footnote may have digitized the image, while FamilySearch did the indexing. Instead of both of them doing the exact same work twice, they have joined together in things like this to create indexes and digitizations for quicker access.

When I first saw links to other websites like this I was pretty surprised. As most of us know, FamilySearch is an organization part of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and so they don't charge for their records for profit like companies like Footnote and Ancestry.com do.

Last month at the Mesa Family History Expo Bryce mentioned the fact that "one day" these images and documents that are linked from Record Search to Footnote and other affiliate sites would be free for "FamilySearch Members". This information got me pretty excited, and I'm sure the same thought was going through everyone else's head at the same time - What exactly is considered a "FamilySearch Member"?

According to Bryce, they are still working on the "exact" definition of a "FamilySearch Member", but he did tell us the general definition. To be a "FamilySearch Member" you must fall under at least one of the categories below:
  1. A member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
  2. Anyone who uses Record Search at a Family History Center
  3. Anyone who uses Record Search at the Family History Library
  4. Anyone who has registered to be a FamilySearch Indexer and meet certain requirements(I think this is where Bryce was talking about the fine tuning as to the definition of a "FamilySearch Member". Indexers have to index a certain amount or be an indexer for a certain period of time. The amount and time has not been specifically defined yet)

Back in Mesa, Bryce said that this will happen within the next few months, but didn't give a date. When I attended his class this morning I wanted to ask him if there was an update to when this is going to be available. According to Bryce as of this morning, they are hoping they will have this access available by the end of April in their "new release". He didn't mention really what all was included in that release, but after he mentioned that I thought that NGS is at the end of April as well, so I am thinking that this "new release" including the access to these records will be announced there at NGS.
Bryce did say that this is not a definite date, but it makes sense that they would be announcing it at NGS. Hopefully we will hear a little more about his before that time.